Removing WWI-era Boosters from NJ Beaches

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection have provided an update on the ongoing efforts to remove WWI-era boosters from the Allenhurst and Loch Arbour beaches, following the recent beachfill placement.

The ongoing construction contract has to date placed roughly 350,000 cubic yards of sand along the shore in front of Loch Arbour and Allenhurst.

As with all other beach renourishment contracts, measures were in place to prevent MEC (Munitions and Explosives of Concern) to reduce the chance for these items to find their way to the beach.

The use of a new area within the permitted Sea Bright borrow area has evidenced a new type of MEC never before encountered during beachfill projects. The design of these boosters is such that they were not captured by the MEC baskets in place and as a result they were inadvertently allowed onto the beach.

The area affected is roughly 2,000 to 2,500 feet of beach in Loch Arbour and Allenhurst. While the boosters are not armed, they may contain aged explosives and should not be handled by the public.

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