USA: Port of San Diego to Host AAPA 2014 Maritime Workshop

  • Business & Finance

Port of San Diego to Host AAPA 2014 Maritime Workshop

The Port of San Diego has announced that it will host the American Association of Port Authorities 2014 Maritime Economic Development Workshop.

Among the key topics on the minds of Western Hemisphere port development, marketing and logistics executives is how to implement and fund transportation infrastructure projects for the growing volumes of goods, both imports and exports, as well as cruise ship passengers, that are flowing through their facilities as world economic conditions improve.

To address these and related questions, the 2014 Maritime Economic Development Workshop will be held Feb. 20-21, 2014. The event, at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront, will feature a host of business and logistics experts, shipping company executives, infrastructure development case studies and a unique three-hour “facilitated dialogue” session to bring the collective knowledge of the entire audience to bear in solving some of the port industry’s toughest economic challenges.

“The Port of San Diego is thrilled to host this important conference of economic development professionals,” said Wayne Darbeau, President and CEO of the Port of San Diego. “Like our sister ports in AAPA, the Port of San Diego is a key player in the economic diversity of our region, with our maritime, industrial and tourism businesses supporting a total of 57,000 jobs.”

“Seaports in the Americas are investing billions of dollars to improve their infrastructure, expand their services, enhance their cargo- and passenger-handling capabilities, create jobs and assist businesses looking to tap into the increasing global demand for both raw materials and domestically-manufactured products,” said Kurt Nagle, AAPA’s president and CEO.

“In order to effectively compete, seaports must deal with issues ranging from finding investment partners and passing effective freight policy legislation at the federal level, to convincing their local and regional stakeholders the investments they are proposing are necessary and worthwhile.”

He added: “Similar to Canada, the Caribbean islands and many Latin American countries, the U.S. needs to invest significantly in its port facilities if it wants to compete as a maritime nation. Focusing on port infrastructure as a separate aspect of international trade obscures the dependence of seaports on a robust domestic surface transportation system.”

[mappress]

Press Release, January 26, 2014

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